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Shutdown debacle leaves Trump with stark choices

1 month ago
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Shutdown debacle leaves Trump with stark choices
It’s as if President Donald Trump’s humiliation over the government shutdown and his failed push to honor his core campaign promise never happened.

“Does anybody really think I won’t build the WALL? Done more in first two years than any President! MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!,” Trump tweeted on Sunday night, hitting back at the overwhelming media consensus that he had been outplayed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

But whether the President is simply defiant or in denial or is yet to process the lessons of the 35-day impasse that ended with his capitulation on Friday, he’s facing wrenching political choices.

Going forward, he would have to adopt a fundamental change of approach if he is to wring money for his border wall and revive a presidency badly damaged by his loss to Democrats in the first clash of the new era of divided government.

The unpleasant reality now facing Trump, and the unchanged political dynamics that provoked the shutdown, are why Washington appears headed for a second one — or a bid by Trump to short circuit Congress by using executive power to build the wall that could cause a constitutional firestorm.

The President’s dilemmas will play out during a three-week short-term funding truce reached Friday to end a shutdown that left 800,000 government workers without multiple paychecks on-time and the nation’s federal infrastructure in chaos.

“I personally think it’s less than 50-50, but you have a lot of very good people on that board,” he said, adding he doubted he would water down his demand for $5.7 billion in wall funding.
Shutdown debacle leaves Trump with stark choices

‘Fair deal’ or new shutdown’

Trump warned on Friday that if he didn’t get a “fair deal” on money for a wall that Democrats vehemently oppose by February 15, government would close again or he’d invoke emergency powers to build it.

Trump’s refusal, so far, to moderate his position does not take into account damage to his political standing in a shutdown that now looks like a grave miscalculation.

The impasse aggravated moderate voters and damaged his poll numbers, as well as united and emboldened Democrats. Trump’s climbdown threatened his standing among his grass roots army for whom his wall is an almost mystical rallying cause.

“I don’t know how any member of the administration or of Congress could think that a shutdown was a worthy pursuit. It never is,” Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said on CBS “Face the Nation” on Sunday.

Trump in a political jam

Signs that the sides are as entrenched as ever explain increasing expectations that the President will declare a national emergency or take some other executive action to reprogram money to fund the wall when the clock runs out.

“At the end of the day the President is going to secure the border, one way or another,” Trump’s acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said on “Fox News Sunday.”

The last few weeks have made clear that Democrats who run the House of Representatives are not going to give Trump anything that looks like his campaign vision of a border wall without getting something serious in return.

They would likely require Trump to offer something on the scale of permanent protection for undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children and even a path to citizenship for a group known as Dreamers.

Trump offered a temporary shield to DACA recipients and other migrants covered by Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for three years in a bid to break the deadlock in the government shutdown negotiations.

Could the White House go big?

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio — while stressing the need to first guarantee border security — thinks that the White House may be prepared to go far bigger than most people think as Trump seeks to fulfill his core campaign promise.

“I believe he’s willing to go even further and do something reasonable with people who have been here a long time unlawfully, but are not criminals,” Rubio told Jake Tapper on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

It’s long been a mystery why Trump, who enjoys a bond with his political base unlike any other recent President has been unwilling to test the limits of that loyalty. After all, though media figures like Rush Limbaugh, Ann Coulter and Mark Levin enjoy huge audiences, no one has ever electrified the populist, nationalist conservative movement like Trump.

And if any Republican President has the political credibility to lead the base to an immigration compromise, it would be Trump.

But the President has rarely made any attempt to reach out to voters beyond his own coalition — apparently believing he can repeat his narrow path to 270 electoral votes that defied all the pundits again in 2020.

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